Sheep, Wolves and Sheepdogs

Sheep with horns3YourSecuritySolution often refers to sheep and wolves in our class and workshop presentations, online and in videos because the analogy is appropriate to the condition of the world today.

There’s nothing wrong with being a sheep. In fact, the vast majority of people act like sheep. We generally follow directions, travel and communicate in set patterns, automatically avoid most trouble and enjoy being part of a social group. It helps our world be orderly and manageable.

But those who seek to do us harm act very much like wolves.
cover-wolf
Our goal at YourSecuritySolution is to help you better detect and defend against the human wolves among us and change what kind of sheep you are. Wild and domestic sheep, though similar in appearance, have key differences in looks and behavior.

Group of Portland sheep rare breed from Isle of Portland Dorset England UKWild sheep, both male and female, typically have horns while domestic sheep are modified through breeding to not have horns or their horns are removed to prevent injury to their keepers and each other.
Group of sheep with black face and legs staring at the camera
Domestic sheep, through centuries of behavior modification, have learned to rely on shepherds and sheepdogs for guidance and protection.

Does that sound familiar?

As the number and ferocity of attacks by society’s wolves increases — from gang and personal crime, criminal protests to international terrorism – the government (our shepherds) and law enforcement (our sheep dogs) can’t keep up. They never really have been able to protect everyone. That’s why it’s important to learn how to be a different kind of sheep, one that uses our natural senses, learned behavior and defensive tools to detect the wolves and protect ourselves and our herd.

YourSecuritySolution wants to help you re-adapt to be more like wild sheep and use your natural abilities to detect danger and, as a member of society’s herd, alert others to avoid the threat whenever possible, escape when necessary and defend yourself with a will to survive.

So, what about the sheepdogs? They run toward and attack the wolves because that’s what they’re bred or trained to do. That’s still the job of our military and law enforcement whose training most citizens just don’t have. If you are a sheepdog, thank you for your service. Because of you our world is still mostly a gentle, peaceful place where most sheep are comfortable and the wolves are wary. It’s time for the sheep to have your back.

 

Paul Soutar